Post-Summits: Greece and the EuroZone

Post-Summits: Greece and the EuroZone

BY PREETI UPADHYAYA In the saga of the financial crisis crippling the Eurozone, it is fitting that Greece has been the currency union’s Achilles Heel. The country is running on fumes.

→ Full Story

Post-Summits: Afghanistan Transition – The Pakistan Factor

Post-Summits: Afghanistan Transition – The Pakistan Factor

BY KELLY GUSTAFSON One of the central achievements of the NATO summit in Chicago in May was a timetable for transitioning troops out of Afghanistan, but President Obama and other leaders failed to address how the transition might work without Pakistan.

→ Full Story

Post-Summits: New Strategic Concept – NATO 3.0

Post-Summits: New Strategic Concept – NATO 3.0

BY ALI DURKIN Leaders of the 28 NATO member countries viewed the 2012 Chicago Summit as an opportunity to put into action plans outlined in the New Strategic Concept of 2010 designed to shape and transform the future of the alliance.

→ Full Story

Summit will test NATO’s undisputed ‘in together, out together’ approach in Afghanistan

Summit will test NATO's undisputed 'in together, out together' approach in Afghanistan

The “in together, out together” approach that has guided NATO’s decade-plus Afghanistan operations will encounter a serious test at the summit in Chicago, with some experts

→ Full Story

Eurozone financial crisis threatens international trade

Eurozone financial crisis threatens international trade

As the Eurozone debt crisis lingers, economists warn that financial shockwaves may soon make their way across the Atlantic.

→ Full Story

NATO says European missile defense ready for next phase

NATO says European missile defense ready for next phase

NATO’s future ballistic missile defense passed its first significant operational test in early April, raising questions about how aggressively the alliance now will pursue the U.S.-led European missile shield that continues to elicit vehement opposition

→ Full Story

21st century threats to be focus for alliance in Chicago

21st century threats to be focus for alliance in Chicago

When the leaders of NATO’s 28 member nations meet in Chicago, they will encounter a heavy-topic agenda including discussions and decisions on Afghanistan transition, ballistic-missile defense, cyber security and the Eurozone crisis. Underlying all, howe

→ Full Story

Libya mission could be a ‘game changer’ for alliance

BY ALI DURKIN

Less than a year since the completion of NATO’s successful but still controversial Libya mission, the Chicago summit may serve as a venue to discuss both its accomplishments and shortcomings and what they mean for the future of the alliance.

“It is clear that Libya is a precedent for how missions will be carried out in the future and how NATO defines its role as a military organization,” said Graham Paul, the French Consul in Chicago. “We are living in an interconnected era, one in which no country or group of countries is equipped to tackle ever-evolving security threats without input and collaboration from other members of the international community.”  → Full Story

Differing views keep energy security off summit agenda

BY ROSA LIN

Crude oil remains consistently above $100 a barrel, with intermittent spikes caused by unrest in the Middle East.  Rising countries such as China and India press their demands on the world oil supply. The most viable alternative to crude oil, nuclear power, took a blow from the 2011 Fukushima disaster.

Despite all this, energy security likely won’t be on the agenda at the NATO summit this year.

“Energy security will not play a role in the Chicago summit,” said Michael Rühle, the head of the Energy Security Section at NATO headquarters in Brussels. The only contribution, he said, would be a classified report on energy that is submitted annually.

NATO countries source their energy from a wide variety of places, which is one of the reasons leaders are reticent to discuss energy policies.          → Full Story

China’s influence felt at G8 despite its absence

BY JOHN SOLYMOSSY

Chinese government leaders will not take part in either the G-8 or NATO summits, though the growing importance of China in the global economy is the 800-pound gorilla in the room at both forums.

Several countries currently included in the G-8 “club,” such as Italy, Canada and France, have faded in importance globally even as China’s influence has soared. Many experts believe for the G-8 to remain an influential and important organization, it will have to consider how China might fit into its global alliance. → Full Story

NATO getting smarter with Smart Defense?

By ELIZABETH BUNN

The EuroZone crisis heightens NATO’s urge to take immediate effective measures to prevent members’ economic problems from turning into a general, more dangerous security crisis.

NATO relies on contributions from member countries to fund its initiatives. As European countries undergo severe austerity cuts, including massive cuts to defense budgets, their capacity to fulfill those financial obligations diminishes.

“Negative growth, or slow growth, cuts into the ability to sustain the type of funding that is necessary for NATO to operate,” said Ambassador J.D. Bindenagel, a veteran of the U.S. diplomatic corps and 2002 recipient of the Presidential Meritorious Service Award.

The question NATO must address – now more than ever – is how to prevent diminishing finances from weakening the alliance and thwarting its ability to execute its goals.   → Full Story


Eurozone’s complex economics frame sluggish recovery

BY KIMBERLY ELSHAM

G-8 members are meeting this May against a backdrop of one of the worst global recessions in history, and the best course of action for recovery is the hottest topic up for discussion at their summit. → Full Story

Potential political conflict may keep short-lived climate forcers off G8 agenda

BY MEGAN TAYLOR MORRISON 

G8 leaders may duck serious discussions on controlling a major source of pollution that includes black soot from cooking fires, methane from dairy farms, and gases released from aerosol cans.  Such talk is uncomfortable because it can appear to shift responsibility for climate change away from industrialized nations and onto poorer, have-not countries. → Full Story