“Whistleblowers, Leaks, and the Media: The First Amendment and National Security”

The new book, edited by Medill’s Ellen Shearer, Paul Rosenzweig and Timothy McNulty delves into the various areas of law surrounding the recent and well-known cases of NSA contractor Edward Snowden, Private First Class Chelsea (formerly Bradley) Manning and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, among others.

Read about the book and a Dec. 1 discussion about the book at the Newseum.


Book Talk: Whistleblowers, Leaks and the Media

Editor Paul Rosenzweig and contributors George Jameson and Gene Policinski will talk about the book on Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2014 at noon in The Heritage Foundation’s Lehrman Auditorium, 214 Massachusetts Ave., NE.

RSVP here.


Covering the Military, Veterans and Homeland Security: Tomorrow’s Trends and Issues

The Medill National Security Journalism Initiative hosted journalists who cover the military, homeland security or defense matters in the National Security Journalism Conference.

The invitation-only conference included a briefing at the Pentagon as well as panel presentations with top military, administration and policy experts to broaden reporter’s expertise on national security and military issues while developing new sources and story ideas.

James Foley’s death inspires other journalists

Northwestern University held a memorial service for the journalist, a graduate of the school who was slain by members of the Islamic State.

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Military mishaps: Arnold L. Punaro tackles misconduct and corruption within American ranks

The Oct. 2 talk, entitled “The Ever-Shrinking Fighting Force,” was held as part of “Covering the Military, Veterans and Homeland Security: Tomorrow’s Trends and Issues,” the Medill National Security Journalism Initiative’s 2014 conference.

Continue to the story and video.


How journalists can make it harder for hackers to steal their information


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Website gives voice to members of American military

Launched in July, Blue Force Tracker shows what’s going on in the military through pieces often produced by current or former members of the armed forces.

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Delphine Halgand on the challenges for growing number of freelance journalists (Webinar)

Delphine Halgand, U.S. director of Reporters Without Borders, explains how freelance reporting is growing around the world and the need those reporters have for a support system as well as information. The organization and its offices provide help for journalists by advising them on available insurance plans, by showing them how to protect their computers as well as their sources from intrusive government snooping. For those covering conflicts, RWB even loans out helmets and flak jackets. The need is greater than ever, according to Halgand, as more governments and groups show hostility toward journalists trying to expose harsh conditions and wrongdoing.

How-to: Covering nuclear weapons operations

Penetrating the world of nuclear weapons is not as hard for a determined journalist as you might think – or as the government might like you to think. It is secretive but not inscrutable.

If you are committed and well-prepared, you can find news in this field and illuminate an aspect of U.S. national security that can seem like an abstraction, even an anachronism, but is still relevant to the lives of all Americans.

The key is knowing where to look, how to decipher the military lingo and why it matters what is taking place within the insular world of nuclear forces. You don’t need to be a military expert or a rocket scientist.

Continue reading our how-to guide on covering nuclear weapons.

Story behind the story

Read how AP’s national security writer discovered problems in the nation’s nuclear defense system and wound up with a ‘months-long cascade of revelations.’