News, Insights & Analysis


does the sudden swarm of flying gadgets need new privacy laws?

CyPhy drone (Image courtesy of CyPhy Works)

It took three years for the FAA to come up with a proposal for how to regulate drones. But it took only about a month after the recommended framework was released for privacy activists to sue.

 →  Read Mary Cirinicione’s story here

experts: terrorism groups find new revenue sources

From left, witnesses Seth G. Jones, Jonathan Schanzer and Juan C. Zarate testify before the Task Force to Investigate Terrorism Financing, part of the House Committee on Financial Services. (Tobias Burns/MEDILL)

As the number of terrorist groups around the world increases, so do the ways in which they’re raising money to fund their activities, experts say.

 →  Read Tobias Burns’ story here

the best training (but the worst social life) is found at twentynine palms

Pfc. Ryan May on the right with Pfc. Jonathan Saldivar taking a break from heavy artillery training. (Niccole Kunshek/MEDILL)

Marines describe it as a “difficult duty” station because of the limited free-time activities, but the chances to hone their training are almost as boundless as the base.

 →  Read Niccole Kunshek’s story here

AIR FORCE CHIEF OF STAFF: CYBER INVOLVEMENT CAN BOOST MISSION PRECISION

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The cyber domain can give the Air Force unprecedented control over the way it carries out its missions, United States Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Welsh III said at an event Wednesday.

 →  Read and listen to the story here

Dettmer: OBAMA, CONGRESS MUST BE BETTER ADVOCATES FOR JOURNALISTS’ SAFETY

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The U.S. government has been negligent in advocating for journalists’ safety in the wake of the Islamic State’s executions of James Foley and Steven Sotloff, according to Jamie Dettmer, a contracted Mideast correspondent for the Daily Beast and Voice of America.

 →  Hear Dettmer’s perspective firsthand

Announcements


MEDILL NATIONAL SECURITY SPECIALIZATION STUDENTS TREATED TO PRIVATE SCREENING OF ‘FORT BLISS’

Check out our exclusive video for insights from the film’s director, Claudia Myers, and to get students’ reactions to the film.

MEDILL NATIONAL SECURITY JOURNALISM INITIATIVE’s JOSH MEYER SERVES AS PULITZER PUBLIC SERVICE JUROR

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Read about this year’s Public Service Gold Medallion winning story
Read the original prize announcement

THE MEDILL NATIONAL SECURITY JOURNALISM INITIATIVE GOES GLOBAL

GIJN_band_logo_large The Medill NSJI has been elected to membership in the Global Investigative Journalism Network, an international association of nonprofit organizations that support, promote, and produce accountability and watchdog reporting. Click here to read the press release

understanding the islamic state: natioNAL WAR COLLEGE PROFESSORS BREAK DOWN ITS ROOTS AND RISE

(From left) Panel moderator Josh Meyer and panelists Dr. Richard B. Andres and Dr. Omer Taspinar speak during the Understanding the Islamic State Panel at the National Press Club in Washington on April 6, 2015. (Jennifer-Leigh Oprihory/MEDILL NSJI) The expert analysis broke down into 2 parts: the link between radicalization and the Islamic State’s rise to power, and social media’s role in radicalization.

Read about the event here

cracking the code: workshop gives journalists a crash course in encryption

TestBed's Aaron Rinehart lectures to seminar attendees prior to the hands-on portion of the day on April 3, 2015. (Jennifer-Leigh Oprihory/MEDILL NSJI) The minds behind TestBed, Inc., an IT consulting firm specializing in IT planning, analytics, testing, prototyping and business advice for the public & private sectors, gave reporters a crash course in digital safety & encryption techniques.  
Read about the event here  
Get a student’s take on the event here


First Time on the Front Line: A Rookie’s Guide to Reporting in Ukraine

PHOTOS + TEXT BY JAMES SPRANKLE FOR THE MEDILL NSJI

  • 12/25: A Ukrainian soldier at a checkpoint near Debaltseve. Note the tourniquet next to the radio. He is also wearing a plate carrier with no Kevlar.  (Photo Credit: James Sprankle)
    12/25: A Ukrainian soldier at a checkpoint near Debaltseve. Note the tourniquet next to the radio. He is also wearing a plate carrier with no Kevlar. (Photo Credit: James Sprankle)

KYIV, UKRAINE — For the last three months, I have been living in Ukraine and covering the war in Donbass as a photojournalist.

In 2014, after seven years in cable news in Washington, I decided to leave D.C. and start documenting the stories that I was interested in. So, I flew to Juba, South Sudan, with a writer buddy and spent the next two months working around the country. I was hooked.

Upon my return to the states, I got to work on planning a trip to Ukraine. I bought a new professional camera and body armor, and spent hours talking to friends and editors about how I was going to take this next step. I arrived in Kyiv on December 10. So far, my time in Ukraine has taught me a tremendous amount about … well, all sorts of things. It’s fair to say that I am a beginner in the conflict zone, but even though I’m new to this line of work, I think I’ve learned a few things that could prove valuable to others considering their first trip to a war zone.

→ Read the complete NSZ guide here

Delphine Halgand on the challenges for growing number of freelance journalists (Webinar)

Delphine Halgand, U.S. director of Reporters Without Borders, explains how freelance reporting is growing around the world and the need those reporters have for a support system as well as information. The organization and its offices provide help for journalists by advising them on available insurance plans, by showing them how to protect their computers as well as their sources from intrusive government snooping. For those covering conflicts, RWB even loans out helmets and flak jackets. The need is greater than ever, according to Halgand, as more governments and groups show hostility toward journalists trying to expose harsh conditions and wrongdoing.